Category Archives: Mini Figures – all scales

One man and his dog

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No sheep involved

Slept badly and filled in down-time by looking for something from year’s ago on own site (how sad can one get?) and came across this piece from five year’s ago.

My first dressed figure, butchered from a bought in standard chap for whom I’ve still got a soft spot and thought I’d share him with you once again.

Link
Anyone at home 1 – the build of a Falstaffian figure, perhaps

I hope you enjoy him – and his dog 🙂

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Bit more awake

Now I think I know what day it is and have, more or less, got myself together, here are a few of the original photos that didn’t make the first cut and which might explain better the description of his clothes and face alterations.  I’d had the doll for some time, partially messed about by me (changing the body shape, giving him hair) and hadn’t had the nerve to finish him.  But having done one or two others that had been less drastically altered, I finally jumped in and sorted this one out.

 

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Pottering in all directions

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(potteringmeaning)

The Trombone Clip

(if you’ve clicked the trombone link above, tell me that doesn’t look just like a giant paperclip)

Been having some glorious sunshine (though horribly windy) and spent loads of time ‘autumnising’ the garden and thinking big thoughts around mini-ing.

Just got back to working with the players in the band and roughing up a trombone for the other part of the brass section.  Then I realised the second figure (for whom it was intended) couldn’t possibly play it as his cheeks stick out too far and he’d never get it over his shoulder.  He’s Mr Oval and he’ll have to go with the hose pipe horn instead which is all in front as it were, whilst Mr P has the trombone.  Such as it is.

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - new projects - creative paperclay semi dressed full figure 2

I do love paperclips.   This ones pretty big.  The miniature funnel for the bell of the trombone needs building up a little towards the back and is generally not fully attached  yet so if you blink it may well fall off, but his hands are not too bad for holding the paperclip in place.

And the big thoughts?

I’ve said I’d not build another house but there’s this ‘thing’ that’s a-growing-of and won’t go away, so I might, just might end up doing it anyway.  Sort of UK 1930s styling, but as it’s still festering away in my head I’ll let it grow a little more before I blab too much 😉

 

Character one: a horn player

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The hands and feet get attached

This is the try-out pair of hands (in white gloves) and booted feet going into action.

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - new projects - creative paperclay hands 2

What big hands you’ve got

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - new projects - creative paperclay feet and socks 2

and short trousers over meat pie shaped bootees

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - new projects - creative paperclay head

and a rather startled look – ah yes, I failed to say that we’re improvising with all the instruments

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - new projects - creative paperclay head and hands

Nice bit of fingering going on there but no keys to finger at the moment

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - new projects - creative paperclay semi dressed full figure

Full figure: no shirt sleeves and horribly bulky cummerbund but both will be covered by yet to be made tail coat – note to self any other cummerbunds needed to be produced with thin fabric not ribbon.  He also needs some buttons down the front of his shirt, don’t you think?  I wonder if I can stick something on the cuffs too.

Well it looks like one tail coat to be made and it’s probably worthwhile having a go at four more sets of hands and feet for the other fellas.  Wish me luck 😉

ps:  Our friend here is built up and joined together with pipe cleaners, wadding and lengths of scrap fabric wrapped around his shape.  His hair is boucle yarn with the core thread that holds it together removed and the ‘wool’ bit combed out with an old toothbrush, his braces are 1:12 furniture or curtain trim and, of course the horn is a hose pipe and funnel.

A gently does it day

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Don’t know what I ate yesterday but yuk last night ensued, hence today am wobbly, so wobbly jobs it is then.

Sneaking up on it from behind

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - new projects - creative paperclay hand sanding and painting

I like using bits of a sponge sanding block

I do mean bits – here I’ve cut a chunk from the corner of a fine faced block.

 

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - new projects - creative paperclay hand sanding and painting

Top row: One block, one set of ‘teeth’ marks from different sized scissors – you can gauge how frilly an edge you will get by how much you can cram into the jaws of the scissors and still cut.
Row two: Frilly bit between fingers on this face but sponge bit on side I can’t see so less damage done there whilst not looking.
Row three: The cut piece also gives one small and one large triangle with a right-angle between.
I find this a very useful implement when working with the dry clay.

 

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - new projects - creative paperclay hand sanding and painting

Not brilliant but rubbed down and painted up glove and cuff with a little blue shading here and there

Footfall

The bandstand

Pushing up hill

It doesn’t seem to matter how long you’ve had an idea or how much planning you’ve done, it’s the getting it up and running that’s really the hard bit.  And, having gained some forward momentum there are always the bumpy bits that follow on.  The time comes, as you turn round and catch a glimpse of the piece in the corner of your eye and you just know there’s something not right enough to pass in a dark alleyway unnoticed.

My mother-in-law used to tell a tale of her childhood.  She was much given to pranks and one day, when she was about six or seven years of age and staying with her grandparents her grandmother could be heard mumbling over and over “There’s summat up with that cat” as she watched it crossing the threshold.  Quite some time later the cry of “Letty!” went up, echoing all over the house, when the mystery was solved and young Letitia had to come out of hiding and face the music.  She’d cut off the cat’s whiskers.

I find “summat up with that (fill in blank as needed)” a very useful phrase when mini-ing.  I’m definitely adrift with the bandstand.  It lacks a little gravitas perhaps, you know, the wrought iron municipal look, and the décor is definitely of the crowded and very messy variety.

Whether I’ve started to solve some of the summat that’s up with the bandstand by an addition of woodwork bits I don’t know, but I do feel a little less ‘itchy’ about it, that’s for sure.