Setting out Tilda’s room

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Them there fairy lights
and their wires

I had always planned to hide the wiring for the fairy lights within a wall space on the outer face of the storeroom block, but in this room I didn’t want to lose an inch of the bedroom floor space.

Decided on a totally floating floor.  The wiring is pretty sturdy stuff and there’s only so much cardboard you can channel out to recess it in before you find your coming through the other side.

This is a particularly strong set of boards with a firm, peel off backing to it.  I’m not sticking it down though, just letting it float about.

Going around the room

(Do click bed or light if you wish to take a closer look at the general messy detail of these composite photos, and these in turn should click once more to become unbecomingly large)

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - dressing a very small bedroom

Viewing from above. The steps down from the main block are missing here as is a curtain yet to come and one or two other bits of more personal items to dress it

Am working my way round slowly dressing the unfinished spaces.  The majority of the remaining tasks are bitty, drying and waiting jobs but it’s a little iffy moving from task to task, filling the waiting time with the remaining fabric work as there’s got to be a limit to how much hand washing this all takes.  We’re talking over-washed old paws and really slowed activity here😉

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PS:

 

A lot of blather and hot air

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just to get a roof on

It’s always roof shapes with me.

If I carry on with mini-ing after Hogepotche it’s got to be room boxes only or something similar, preferably with no ceilings let alone a roof!

I get in such a bundle of mental knots with the roofs.  OK, eventually, after much hacking and remodelling something comes out of it – this girl doesn’t give up in a tussle with a piece of cardboard and a few wood strips, but the whole structure never feels the same.  For instance, once-upon-a-time this kitchen storeroom extension was a nice clean-lined build.  Each room a simple box, each containing its necessaries but go up a level and what have we got, just trouble.

The puzzle

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - plan of main building and extension

Stores extension butted up against the main building.
The stores block has a slightly lower loft floor level than the main block room and a workable ridge height but very little at the outer edge.

I’m OK with the fellas having a hard time in their side of the loft sleeping area with very low roof lines, but not so keen on the women crawling around to get to the palliasse for a night’s kip.

The plan had been for a dead space for a lighting control and a battery box.  It became obvious that you could squeeze another useful room from it and I can never see an extra space go to waste.  Its access would have to be from the main building, keeping the women’s area accessible only from the house.  The main block room is slightly higher up, much higher ceilinged .

Moving from the small cubby in the high room into the much, much lower ceilinged extension roof space is a puzzle to solve.   How much head space can be squeezed in along how wide a path?  It would be high enough at the ridge side but virtually unusable at the outer edge as it stands at present and a crawl in area to a floor bed in the extension somehow doesn’t appeal this time.

Levels and that flow thing

The idea is to create a little bit of roofing that is square-on to the main block giving a straight-ceiling entry area to this upper space.  See photo A below

The top sketch (right-hand diagram) shows the profile of the store block triangular roof against the end section of the upper room.  The lower diagram is a side view of the outer wall to the store block with a planned stepped approach to the wall height in the room.  See photo B below

Working it out

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - raising the roof level and turning through 90º

Photo A: Raising the roof level at the entrance to the room and turning the slope through 90º for a short run.

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - raising the roof level and turning through 90º - #2

Photo B: With a slope running at 90º to the stores block you can see that it makes a squared off entrance to the room for a short distance, giving free access at this point for anyone living in either space and a height of 7″ (18.5 cms) dropping to 4.5″ and finally 3″ when it rejoins the rest of the loft space slope all round the building. The ridge (apart from the entrance slope run) is about 5″ (12.5 cms) which I find acceptable because I could stand up in it – if it were not 1:12!

Roof shape now

The square opening is in the fourth wall to room above the kitchen – sorry if not posted about building that but will dig out the photos wherever I’ve managed to lose them.

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - viewing all sleep area

On the right you can see the stepping down of the wall heads for the changing slope. I’ll post detail of the room space next time but here is a view of both sleeping areas for the women living and working here. Once the roof is on it’s a shot that we can’t get again😉

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - newer roof and older building

A long shot for a little perspective?

Well not so sure about how it will all work out but am ploughing on and will report back whether total calamity.

 

 

 

Lolly sticks, pewter painted paper

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plus two bits of moulding
and
the important bit

– a padlock and hasp to make an old-fashioned coffer for Tilda, roughly based on various medieval chests and coffers found in a search for Medieval and plank chests.

The corner ‘metal strapping’ is more painted paper.  I’ve made the coffer a bit of a strange shape, with a lid smaller than the full width so that there are short, boxed off ends into whose corners you can stuff things.

As I understand it, the idea when storing clothing or cloth generally was to squash the items down with layers of lavender or other useful herb between to help keep the moth at bay – both the herbs and the squashing were thought to be good for this.

The tale of Tilda Warren’s coffer

A bit of a back story

In this house there are four generations of the Riddingly family along with various relatives visiting and some actually working for them too.  (See posting entitled Statsfor info on Hogepotche Hall Personnel.)

Amongst the workers there’s Tilda Warren, daughter of Edward Padget (master builder – on the roof) and Elizabeth (née Poole, part-time cook and at present directing preparations in the great hall).

Now please do read on …

Tilda was married less than two years ago but her husband Samuel died of a winter fever within the first year.  They had been living in rooms provided with his employment and, therefore, finding herself homeless and not at all happy at the thought of returning to her father’s house, she has joined Hogepotche Hall whilst she comes to terms with her situation.  She is now working as the live-in cook, helping her cousin Catherine deVander (daughter of the Guild Master but also widowed and now housekeeper at Hogepotche) with the running of the establishment generally and with the daily care of Catherine’s three children.

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - a tale of Tilda Warren

Tilda Warren

Tilda is prepared to accept the cramped room she has over the kitchen as her home, whilst also sharing some of Catherine’s kindly offered storage space in the attic.  Unfortunately this has had to be emptied due to the wind and tree damage on the roof and not only have most of Tilda’s things had to go back to her parent’s house, but many of Catherine’s belongings are now being stored there too.

The things Tilda keeps by her in her small sleeping space over the kitchen are placed lovingly in the coffer left to her by her husband, given to him by his mother, who in turn inherited it from her grandmother.  So Tilda now owns a very old chest, in an old style with the history of her husband’s family tied up in it.  She finds that she enjoys the idea that its story belongs to her now and not to the Padgets or Riddinglys, opening up for her a world of other possibilities.

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - Tilda Warren's coffer chest

Tilda Warren’s coffer

Continuing the same recipe

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Holding bits up with one hand
whilst making good with the other

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - clamping false beam to wall

Running repairs before more make-over

I’m always surprised that any of Hogepotche Hall has lasted this long.  And yet, and yet … am now miffed as I gently remodel the women’s sleep area into something else, causing as little disturbance as possible, when a chunk of wood (which I never touched, Your Honour, honestly) falls off the wall.

It would seem that the, recommended, ‘proper wood glue’ though it was when applied five years ago is now giving up on its gluey-ness where its been asked to hold a mock beam to the walls.

 

Following day

The bed cubby hole looks a bit modern looking but I’m sure someone would have come up with it then too.  Should have been one bed for the two girls but didn’t like the look of it so fiddled about and managed to get a chest tucked in under the top bed which is useful.

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - changing look of a small chest

It’s a small soft wood domed chest from eBay from which the dome has been hacked off (didn’t like the “dominess” after all) and replaced by mock planking, holes drilled for rope handles and the brassy clasp colour taken down with a little pewter paint.  Also scored some plank marks round the body of it – now it looks like a crate with a lid.

Doesn’t look like anything to write home about but it quite nicely and quietly sits there under the back bed hinting at being more than it is.

That battery light

What’s the colour scheme?

I have a colour scheme?  Well let’s see.  What have we got?

theinfill dolls house blog Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - a Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean dolls house blog - looking for colour 3

Stepping back again to view adjoining spaces – hard to judge, should have put the other lights on.

OK, decision time followed by a bit of action:  what combo of colours, size of pieces, finish to edges, what else?  Clothes hanging off pegs in both room spaces, more hanging herbs, the odd pair of clogs and an apron perhaps …