Category Archives: Next Door Semi

All mod cons

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Not quite; that kitchen certainly needs a little more modernising, but in this particular case it’s the addition of a TV aerial that brings Nostalgia Close into the flow of the 1950s.

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Wonky and with wiring running on the outside, giving the top of the central support something of a wide look, but here it is, which is good because now we can all get cosy and watch ‘Robin Hood’ on Saturday tea time

theinfill art deco dolls house blog, theinfill dolls house blog, theinfill 1930s-50s Deco House, Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - Medieval Tudor Jacobean dolls house blog - brickwork chimneys and TV aerial

It looks like the corner stays, wrap-around ‘cables’ and aerial upright are the only things holding some of this chimney stack together

Next door remaining walling

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The whole of next door’s wall is now dirtied-up – still not solved how to get a reasonable photo of it! This flash shot does give a strange shadow of the aerial.

theinfill art deco dolls house blog, theinfill dolls house blog, theinfill 1930s-50s Deco House, Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - Medieval Tudor Jacobean dolls house blog - brickwork chimneys and TV aerial

In one of the broken pots sits a very small seagull

What’s a-doin now?

There’s still a street scene to do but I’m leaving it to stew about a bit.  I’d had a fancy for a street light and have invested in two different ones.  It’s all a bit Goldilocks; the first one’s much too small and the second one, though a good height is much, much too spindly. It also (of necessity because of its height) has an amazingly wide base to support its eight inch spindliness so it takes up the whole of the pavement width.  I tried widening the spindly aspect with split black straws with some success, but even sinking that huge base in would just leave it stranded right bang slap in the middle of the paving, so not a runner. To street light or not to street light?  Still working on possibilities – the small one could stand on one of the wall pillars perhaps?  That’s the nearest thing to a solution I’ve come up with.  Perhaps a wall mounted light near the porch opening would give external lighting – not the same as an old gas light though, is it 🙂

Whilst that’s sorting itself out, I’ve started stripping down the workroom, disposing of bits of rubbish I’ve been collecting in case it came in for something, (I know, I’m going to regret some of that ), washing out paint pots that have been filled with particular mixes for Nostalgia Close and generally rearranging the work surfaces/tables for easier access while digging out space for the things I would like to move on to.  So much to rearrange and so much to sieve through, it’s totally hypnotising – mind going blank over piles of cardboard – and more cardboard.  Send in a rescue party if I’m not heard of in the next two weeks.

theinfill art deco dolls house blog, theinfill dolls house blog, theinfill 1930s-50s Deco House, Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - Medieval Tudor Jacobean dolls house blog - brickwork chimneys and TV aerial

An indoor roof-top silhouette

Blocked Drain

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Scene-driven plumbing

Great fun playing with the possibilities

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I bought in all of the components for this run of guttering
(though I’ve used some black plastic straws here and there).
I’m not good enough at assembling the parts so there’s sagging at the back corner.
Why not take advantage of it, I thought to myself.
The householders have now got a bad case of damp in that corner of the main bedroom, hidden behind one curtain.

 Next door’s front area

First there was “shall I bother” with down-pipes, drain covers, gutters and all the other paraphernalia for the job.  So many pieces are needed to do a fairly full arrangement, be it for full-size-real or mini.  All of which leads to the choice between none, just a gentle indication of pipe-work or go for the whole bundle.

The sensible decision was taken to go for a minimal only and keep the work and price as low as possible.  Then far too many questions arose around what and where and how to connect, corner-turning and working around a bay …

You get the general image.  And so it’s grown.

— ~-~ —

The bought components are from Sussex Crafts and are wonderful in their look and finish (and the delivery is super quick too).  I may make more use of black plastic straws to mix in, particularly for extra down-pipes and also have a go at making any needed drain covers.

A touch of make-up, perhaps some paint and a little glue

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Serious weather-proofing for the skin?  Well, not in this case; quite the opposite.

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Moved over one section to do a little more brick distressing too

Moving along to do a make-over on the next stretch of pristine walling.

Carving

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or possibly sculpting

But definitely taking a knife to it.

The brickwork on the house is fibreglass cladding in Flemish bond from Jennifer’s of Walsall, and, if applied with care, sits smoothly on the surface of your work.  I did find that it bubbled or rucked up on occasion, but that’s more to do with the size of the piece being applied and the tendency of the material to stretch and shift, I think.

Now I’d like some of it to look a little more time-worn, so I’ve been working on it here and there, prying the odd brick or two out, pushing some edges backward and generally making good with the edges and colouring up the whole.

The areas of stretch/rucking can be seen clearly on the wall face photo.  I might still take a knife to those or may just ignore them.

The brick cladding was applied to either card or foamboard so it allows some degree of sculpting.  To help keep the damaged surface in place, the last cleaning up layer is hobbyists’ PVA smeared all over, giving slightly shiny bricks.