Report from under the trash pile

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Still digging in the hoard while playing around, though trying hard to avoid the distractions of things rediscovered in darkened corners.

However, a pigeon arrived and, of course, it had to have a home.  I mean, it might have got lost in all the flurry of paper, cardboard and long-stored finery, mightn’t it?

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Apparently reception from up there is pretty good

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It was a bit of a roping up job to house her as I’ve parked the house tight into the corner. As you can see the TV aerial is now one of the farthest points to reach.

I’ve worked through most of the tall shelves of the bookcase on the left, leaving the modelling clays and ‘gardening’ items alone for the moment.  Also had a bit of a rationalisation of its partner shelving (out of the pic) giving a little more book room but it needs a really good sort of the mostly 70s/80s items of furniture I’ve bought and not used.

At ground level under the work bench on the right I’ve been through everything up to and including halfway down its eight foot length, where the lighting set of drawers have been left alone.  Too difficult to know what to keep there.  Also done about the same amount of clearing up on the surface of the bench itself.

Which brings me round to an area of wall above the other half of the work bench.  There’s a set of shallow shelves, originally built to house our daughter’s books and toys when she was very young.  It now houses hammers, knives, chisels, bradawls – you get the picture – but also has containers of ends of wood left over from when I first started doing this thing ten, eleven years ago.  And that is going to take oh, so very long and today is probably the day, now that there’s a couple of table surfaces free and some actual floor space to walk on.

Then there’ll be the fabrics and off-cuts of cardboard and mountboard that are too small to bag.

Time to dive in once more – anyone notice where I put that dust mask?

By special request

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The street lights

These two are standard (no pun intended) ones that you can buy from various places and have an outline shape that is most like the gas lights I remember.  They are both LED battery lights.

I’m moaning about them because I haven’t yet worked out the most suitable use of one or the other.  They are well-made lights that really do their job as advertised.  I’m just fussing around, is all.

The biggly one

I should have made the pavement much, much bigger as there’s no way of getting round this safely on foot. I mean, we used to put an arm round one and swing out and around it but it definitely left somewhere for folk to walk past.  Did I know it was this wide at the base when I bought it?  Afraid I didn’t notice that measurement, only the height which was ideal.

The little-y one

The smaller one does sort of look OK but I hadn’t bargained for putting it on the wall as it seems very out of character with the houses of this style that I knew.  It makes the lamp look as though it is an outsized private bit of lighting, set up to annoy the neighbours, don’t you think.  If it gets used here I wouldn’t put the tubing on it but leave it thin.

End of kvetch.

The idea had been that, when viewing the house from the back and peering around down the length of what’s left of next door, you would be able to see the light shining through what’s left of that facade and it would add a bit of ‘life’ and further atmosphere to the scene of destruction.

I suspect I’m much nearer deciding not to use either of them and do without external illumination.

 

All mod cons

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Not quite; that kitchen certainly needs a little more modernising, but in this particular case it’s the addition of a TV aerial that brings Nostalgia Close into the flow of the 1950s.

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Wonky and with wiring running on the outside, giving the top of the central support something of a wide look, but here it is, which is good because now we can all get cosy and watch ‘Robin Hood’ on Saturday tea time

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It looks like the corner stays, wrap-around ‘cables’ and aerial upright are the only things holding some of this chimney stack together

Next door remaining walling

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The whole of next door’s wall is now dirtied-up – still not solved how to get a reasonable photo of it! This flash shot does give a strange shadow of the aerial.

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In one of the broken pots sits a very small seagull

What’s a-doin now?

There’s still a street scene to do but I’m leaving it to stew about a bit.  I’d had a fancy for a street light and have invested in two different ones.  It’s all a bit Goldilocks; the first one’s much too small and the second one, though a good height is much, much too spindly. It also (of necessity because of its height) has an amazingly wide base to support its eight inch spindliness so it takes up the whole of the pavement width.  I tried widening the spindly aspect with split black straws with some success, but even sinking that huge base in would just leave it stranded right bang slap in the middle of the paving, so not a runner. To street light or not to street light?  Still working on possibilities – the small one could stand on one of the wall pillars perhaps?  That’s the nearest thing to a solution I’ve come up with.  Perhaps a wall mounted light near the porch opening would give external lighting – not the same as an old gas light though, is it 🙂

Whilst that’s sorting itself out, I’ve started stripping down the workroom, disposing of bits of rubbish I’ve been collecting in case it came in for something, (I know, I’m going to regret some of that ), washing out paint pots that have been filled with particular mixes for Nostalgia Close and generally rearranging the work surfaces/tables for easier access while digging out space for the things I would like to move on to.  So much to rearrange and so much to sieve through, it’s totally hypnotising – mind going blank over piles of cardboard – and more cardboard.  Send in a rescue party if I’m not heard of in the next two weeks.

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An indoor roof-top silhouette

Street-side

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A case of elephants and dunces

At the gate end of the street there is the problem of two floating pieces of wall; the left-hand end piece (which I’ve already knocked off once) and the piece the other side of the gate which abruptly stops at the cut for the slice of house.

The street and the step with the big, big drop

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Stepped pavement and one big drop for any unwary mini off the main curb out into oblivion

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The curb is made of two pieces; I’ve rolled the top of the curb pieces to overlap the vertical pieces and give a generally softer look at the edges

(Going to have to put something or someone on that red brick lump on the pavement I think)

Talking about brickwork, next door’s walling is built from mountboard faced both sides with textured paintwork.  I’ve inserted into to the top edge of the foam thickness bits of brick and tile to try to give the impression that the core is built from brick and plastered over.

Paving

using left over packet tops (1 mm card) from way-back when I used to make puppets

I’ve gone for stone slab paving in the street, though S thinks it looks more like crazy paving than anything, that is until I showed him on Google satellite view exactly what it was supposed to look like.  Sad to say that all the first sections of the pavements/sidewalks on most streets around where we lived have been tarred over, but the rest of the streets are very much the same.  I’d entirely forgotten about the odd sizes for curb stones though.

This paving that’s needed for Nostalgia Close is just one long strip that I felt needed a little ‘interest’ for the eye, hence the strange stepped up bit by the gate (health and safety not being a main concern in mini-land).  To keep me concentrated on the job in hand I needed some ‘interest’ for the mind and so I’ve scattered many an elephant and dunce along the wayWhat am I on about?  Well, I do remember as a kid we were supposed to be careful about not stepping on the cracks but more interesting was that, if a slab of paving went right across from wall to curb stone – a dunce – then you had to jump over it.  Also an elephant had to be avoided in the same way (I think).  An elephant being one large, squarish slab with two or three small ones to fill in at its side, one above another or two very small ones side by side in place of one of the smaller.

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An elephant

Which is why I was a little put out when I found, via satellite view, that the end paving of our street had been tarred, because there, just before the ankle-turning turn from one fairly steep slope onto the steep slope of the main road going down to the left, were to be found one dunce followed by at least one elephant.  Talk about one giant leap for …!  But, alas no more.

However, I’ve given the local mini kids a real problem.  Directly outside their gate is a dunce and to one side of the gate, just one step on, there are two elephants together and, of course, there are both dunces and elephants all along the line.  Have fun little ones, it beats hopscotch any day.