Street-side

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A case of elephants and dunces

At the gate end of the street there is the problem of two floating pieces of wall; the left-hand end piece (which I’ve already knocked off once) and the piece the other side of the gate which abruptly stops at the cut for the slice of house.

The street and the step with the big, big drop

theinfill art deco dolls house blog, theinfill dolls house blog, theinfill 1930s-50s Deco House, Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - Medieval Tudor Jacobean dolls house blog - the street outside

Stepped pavement and one big drop for any unwary mini off the main curb out into oblivion

theinfill art deco dolls house blog, theinfill dolls house blog, theinfill 1930s-50s Deco House, Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - Medieval Tudor Jacobean dolls house blog - the street outside

The curb is made of two pieces; I’ve rolled the top of the curb pieces to overlap the vertical pieces and give a generally softer look at the edges

(Going to have to put something or someone on that red brick lump on the pavement I think)

Talking about brickwork, next door’s walling is built from mountboard faced both sides with textured paintwork.  I’ve inserted into to the top edge of the foam thickness bits of brick and tile to try to give the impression that the core is built from brick and plastered over.

Paving

using left over packet tops (1 mm card) from way-back when I used to make puppets

I’ve gone for stone slab paving in the street, though S thinks it looks more like crazy paving than anything, that is until I showed him on Google satellite view exactly what it was supposed to look like.  Sad to say that all the first sections of the pavements/sidewalks on most streets around where we lived have been tarred over, but the rest of the streets are very much the same.  I’d entirely forgotten about the odd sizes for curb stones though.

This paving that’s needed for Nostalgia Close is just one long strip that I felt needed a little ‘interest’ for the eye, hence the strange stepped up bit by the gate (health and safety not being a main concern in mini-land).  To keep me concentrated on the job in hand I needed some ‘interest’ for the mind and so I’ve scattered many an elephant and dunce along the wayWhat am I on about?  Well, I do remember as a kid we were supposed to be careful about not stepping on the cracks but more interesting was that, if a slab of paving went right across from wall to curb stone – a dunce – then you had to jump over it.  Also an elephant had to be avoided in the same way (I think).  An elephant being one large, squarish slab with two or three small ones to fill in at its side, one above another or two very small ones side by side in place of one of the smaller.

theinfill art deco dolls house blog, theinfill dolls house blog, theinfill 1930s-50s Deco House, Hogepotche Hall –Hodgepodge Hall - Medieval Tudor Jacobean dolls house blog - the street outside

An elephant

Which is why I was a little put out when I found, via satellite view, that the end paving of our street had been tarred, because there, just before the ankle-turning turn from one fairly steep slope onto the steep slope of the main road going down to the left, were to be found one dunce followed by at least one elephant.  Talk about one giant leap for …!  But, alas no more.

However, I’ve given the local mini kids a real problem.  Directly outside their gate is a dunce and to one side of the gate, just one step on, there are two elephants together and, of course, there are both dunces and elephants all along the line.  Have fun little ones, it beats hopscotch any day.

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