Ceiling: I think not

Standard

But first it’s the wrong trousers

Been a bit of a busy 12-14 days round here. Nothing to do with elections, may I say – more allied to finding trousers that fit (failure) and trying to get used to travelling a bit further afield without falling over for at least a day afterwards (jury out on that one).

Back to the minis

Only problems here concern memory. Ah, yes that illusive thingy.  Can I clearly remember/read and understand notes on decisions made the last time glue and paint brush were in my hands? Well, here’s hoping that new decisions might coincide with previous ones, and if not, as long as they kind of work out, then that’ll be OK

The Ceiling

theinfill dolls house blog - Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean 1:12 dolls house - private sitting room coomed ceiling

All those bits firmly stuck but not fitting too well. Sue Cook very small Tudor rosettes in the corners. (Yes, the front floor/ceiling below does sag horribly)

theinfill dolls house blog - Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean 1:12 dolls house - private sitting room coomed ceiling

Where all bits meet and chaos breaks out 😉

theinfill dolls house blog - Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean 1:12 dolls house - private sitting room coomed ceiling

That rug is a paper print of my version of Holbein’s “Ambassadors” carpet. It’s stuck down on the area that goes under the Guild Master’s office floor so is only visible when porch is not docked to the building

theinfill dolls house blog - Medieval, Tudor, Jacobean 1:12 dolls house - private sitting room coomed ceiling

Building commenced up to the ridge.

The ceiling was always going to be a bit problematic. It has coomed slopes on two sides and a flat gable-end wall with an open face on the opposite fourth wall offering not much support on that side.   All the “plasterwork” decorations are in varying materials. A recap on those materials used for the faux plasterwork:  there are various air-drying clays with applied stencil impressions, small raised pattern wallpaper on the cooming and central ceiling panel and mostly 1:24 scale mouldings such as skirting boards and trims employed around and about.  All glue differently, all take paint differently and all dry out from painting at different rates.  Why didn’t I think of that before using them?  Well, I did, but I think it’s called the optimism of youth – coming to me a bit late, I know.  (Or do I mean foolhardiness?)

The semi ‘floating’ end of the ceiling (the bit nearest the viewer) is glued to the underside of the cross-piece of the roof A-frame whilst the other end, at the gable is balanced on a ridge of moulding above the window where the wall ‘plasterwork’ meets the ceiling ‘plasterwork’.  Lots of clothes pegs used as sky-hooks whilst glue was drying, though this time I’m pleased to say none were harmed in the making.

I’ve failed miserably to fit adequately and match in all the moulding pieces and thus am cross with myself so there are no close-ups as it’s all far too messy.  Too late to take it down and start again, so if you kindly view it through half-closed eyes with your head tipped to one side it just about passes muster on a foggy day when the haar is rolling in.

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