Troublesome bread?

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Caged loaves

I couldn’t get to do the trimming bits today so all the walls in the photos are still ‘undone’ as it were.  Instead I had fun trying to make a hanging food larder or cage or cradle – whichever you prefer.  I got glue everywhere!  But the door to it does open.

theinfill – the infill – Tudor, Elizabethan, Jacobean Dolls House Blog – Front Porch internal dressing - hanging food cradle

Over-handled as usual and rough as anything but I’m pleased to say that it works

theinfill – the infill – Tudor, Elizabethan, Jacobean Dolls House Blog – Front Porch internal dressing - hanging food cradle

and there’s bread in it too, freshly made

What’s it for?

theinfill – the infill – Tudor, Elizabethan, Jacobean Dolls House Blog – Front Porch internal dressing - hanging food cradle

It’s to hang within the porch.
I’m imagining this as part of the Guild’s dole of bread
to those in need.

Where is it?

theinfill – the infill – Tudor, Elizabethan, Jacobean Dolls House Blog – Front Porch internal dressing - hanging food cradle

Hanging in front of James the clerk, who doesn’t seem to be at his desk at the moment.

theinfill – the infill – Tudor, Elizabethan, Jacobean Dolls House Blog – Front Porch internal dressing - hanging food cradle

Porch docked with entrance hall and through to the Great Hall

I don’t know if there will be only the one time of day when they’ll dole out bread (with or without ale and cheese) or if the food cradle (or cage or bread larder) will be refilled during the day at a set time. Being a large Guild House/Hall there will also be travellers/other traders dropping by in need of a food and rest.

Made from …

There are the visibly cut down staircase spindles all round, bits of obeche of various sections and balsa used for top and bottom.  The balsa pieces were cut to 1½ inches by 1 inch and I stupidly cut the long edge against the grain and didn’t realise till it was being finished.  (Note to self.)  The corners of the top were cut out to house the uprights and so that the hanging pins could be inserted in their tops.

The hanging points for the cupboard are the heads and a little of the shank of large head dress making pins, whilst the rope is untwisted thin white parcel string dyed, slip knotted around each head and heavily glued.

The door is hung on bits of dress making pin at top and bottom and the catch is a piece of florists wire.

The bread is Staedtler Fimo terracotta coloured air-drying clay painted over.

And I’m sorry to tell you that there is still probably more glue on the tips of my fingers than is actually being used to hold the object together.

I wonder where James has gone – he must have fallen over.

—~—

Plas Mawr, Conwy  – town house, built circa 1580

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