Tiling the Tower

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The tower is not symmetrical which poses a ‘nice’ problem when building its roof, filling in the beams and laying the tiling.  I’ve used Richard Stacey Versi-Tiles, a reversible cardboard tile covered in a clay slip so that it has texture.  I chose these rather than full clay for various reasons:  much, much easier to trim, lightweight and less cost.

The tiles come with yellow spotting on the darker side, giving some look of lichen etc, but I’ve rubbed in various colours of soft pastels to add a further blending.

The images have a wet look as they were taken when a coat of matte varnish had just been added.  Have varnished to give a harder finish to the tiling so that they might withstand the various knocks and bangs I’m bound to administer as the work goes along.

theinfill – Medieval, Tudor and Jacobean dolls house blog – tiling a roof with Richard Stacey Vari-tiles.

theinfill – Medieval, Tudor and Jacobean dolls house blog – tiling a roof with Richard Stacey Vari-tiles.

Greens and yellows rubbed in along with greys, and tiles damaged and slipping all over the place. (Excess varnish was removed after the photo)

theinfill – Medieval, Tudor and Jacobean dolls house blog – tiling a roof with Richard Stacey Vari-tiles.

Having decided that I couldn’t be trusted with real lead for the flashings, I’ve used cardboard drag-painted grey and pewter with a little darker pastel thrown in for good measure.

theinfill – Medieval, Tudor and Jacobean dolls house blog – tiling a roof with Richard Stacey Vari-tiles.

Long shot showing relationship to chimney stack more fully

If the so-called matte finish dries too shiny I might take a fine piece of sandpaper to it at some point.  Will probably wait till have more of the tiling in place before making that judgement.  Somewhere between 280 and 300 tiles used.

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4 responses »

    • That’s v kind of you 🙂 Talc, yes, I’ve thunk thereon and wondered if it might turn it all a lighter shade of pale. What do you think? Have a go and discover? Well, at least it might smell nice and the talc would be fairly easily removable.

      Am hoping, at some point, to stick a bit of greenery in the nooks and crannies, creating a small hanging gardens here and there in the damp and clogged areas. Best try the talc first.

      Thanks so much for dropping by and for the lovely comment.

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