Reclaiming Gothic for Tudor usage

Standard

theinfill - Medieval, Tudor and Jacobean dolls house - Gothic

No good at making arches

I had a fancy for arches to break up the stone wall a little and the easiest way I could get hold of something more or less the shape I had in mind was to buy a packet of die-cut card used in card making and scrapbooking.

 theinfill - Medieval, Tudor and Jacobean dolls house – Gothic - die-cut card window shape

Cream marbled card windows for card making
theinfill - Medieval, Tudor and Jacobean dolls house – Gothic

Hacked about and tailored to fit around the banner holders, then given an undercoat of grey

 

The original thought was to make the arches many layers thick to give a greater 3D look, but this was jettisoned as too complex when it came to fitting the mini pillars.

The pillars are 24th scale full round wooden items which needed very little trimming at the back of the base to fit them to the ledge they’re seated on.

When dry, the card and the mouldings (Borcraft Miniatures still have some embossed wood items) were coloured and shaded with pastel crayons in an attempt to match them to the existing stonework and given suitable markings imitating joints in the masonry.

theinfill - Medieval, Tudor and Jacobean dolls house – Gothic - card marked as stonework

Shaded and marked as stonework though looking a little thin.  They could do with a raised edging to represent an outer moulding, perhaps.  Where did I put that string?

The embossed pattern of rings on the moulding ledge is showing up nicely here.  The same wood is in use at floor level but the other way up

theinfill - Medieval, Tudor and Jacobean dolls house – Gothic

Still in need of a bit of a top moulding so that the mini pillars don’t stop in the middle of nowhere.

It’s certainly no longer a large blank stone wall but probably would have been OK with just the pillars perhaps.

Well, it’s possibly less Victorian and will do the job of an atmospheric background to the furniture and general goings on in this part of the Great Hall.  One more panel to do on the other side of the room below one of the windows and then I can move on a little more.

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