Lighting – why is it always lighting? Dark under the overhang – one candle power isn’t enough

Standard

Tweaking the possibilities

The single candle provides interesting light and shadow over young man amongst the roses but not sufficient light for any detail, which tends to make him appear a more creepy than intended.  The whole scene could also do with a little more being thrown centrally and to add light and shade to the gent by the fire.

Tried providing an extra light for each area but the fireside one was not successful and settled for a longer throw of light from under the balcony.

Steps taken

  • Added light coloured hanging to Great Hall side of family dining room doorway:

This is a dark corner under the stairs at one end of the balcony and directly behind the leaning figure

theinfill - dolls house lighting - Medieval, Tudor to Jacobean Great Hall

A well known carpet fixed into folds with fray stop spray and heavy dry ironing on tacked pleating – taking since removed

theinfill - dolls house lighting - Medieval, Tudor to Jacobean Great Hall

Attached to a cocktail stick with oblong beads to lift ends, and used as hanging rail

  • Curtain behind the head of young man:

A change in background contrasts – providing some small amount of light bounce too

 theinfill - dolls house lighting - Medieval, Tudor to Jacobean Great Hall

The lighter colour of the hanging, instead of the dark woodwork, gives a better outline to the dark hatted head from most viewing angles
  • Placement of the LED light-strip

The position of the light is one cross beam over from the figure in order to allow the sideways light spill to be more central to the room.  This has its drawbacks as it places the candle light spread further forward than it should be – it should shine more directly down on the figure and  be more central to the candle light fitting existing light spread, but I decided this was the best compromise to allow lighting over a wider, more directed area.

theinfill - dolls house lighting - Medieval, Tudor to Jacobean Great Hall

LED lighting strip, painted over with white acrylic to reduce brightness and increase warmth.

theinfill - dolls house lighting - Medieval, Tudor to Jacobean Great Hall

Viewed from entrance hall, you can just espy the strip

The light strip is fixed to a piece of flattened architrave moulding, painted over with a little white acrylic to reduce the strength and add a little more warmth, and shielded by a two plank piece of paper-backed flooring which can be adjusted a little by hand.

The idea was, as well as getting the light more or less where it was wanted, to avoid it spilling too much onto the beam nearest the figure, which would have drawn more attention to the fact that the light source is coming in from completely the wrong direction.

  • Overall result:

theinfill - dolls house lighting - Medieval, Tudor to Jacobean Great Hall

Light from strip and light from candle overlapping on standing figure with a little light bounce off pale coloured hanging

theinfill - dolls house lighting - Medieval, Tudor to Jacobean Great Hall

General view of room lighting – probably too bright on figure now but it will do

With this level of sideways light spill it’s possible to gain some central light which was sadly missing before.  The overhead large chandelier tends to light the upper part of the hall only and does not provide enough downward light.

All-in-all, though horribly fiddly, I reckon it was probably worthwhile.

Now, after spending more time than I care to own up to in getting into various contorted positions so that I could see what was going on, I’m off to try to get the interesting kinks out of my back and neck.  Wish me luck.

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